Kospet Hope Sar Values

Hello support of Kospet, 

I recently bought myself a Kospet Hope and I was curious about the SAR value (specific apsorbtion rate) of this device. 

I couldn’t find any information regarding this on the internet. 

It would be great if you could give me this information. 

Thanks in advance. 
Best regards
HopeUserGermany

Feb 14, 2019 12:27:45 GMT HopeUserGermany said:




Hello support of Kospet, 

I recently bought myself a Kospet Hope and I was curious about the SAR value (specific apsorbtion rate) of this device. 

I couldn’t find any information regarding this on the internet. 

It would be great if you could give me this information. 

Thanks in advance. 
Best regards
HopeUserGermany
In researching this what I found was the laboratory methods used to measure SAR values of devices is somewhat inconclusive and not all that accurate.  But in answer to a question about the SAR value of a Samsung Gear 3 elicited the following response. 

SAR: Specific absorption rate (SAR) is a measure of the rate at which energy is absorbed by the human body when exposed to a radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic field. It can also refer to absorption of other forms of energy by tissue, including ultrasound.

Then: Relax, your smartphone and smartwatch won’t — and can’t — give you cancer (unless you are someone who walks around all day with it on and stuck in your ear)

Personally this is not something that even makes it onto my radar. 

Feb 14, 2019 12:27:45 GMT HopeUserGermany said:


Hello support of Kospet, 

I recently bought myself a Kospet Hope and I was curious about the SAR value (specific apsorbtion rate) of this device. 

I couldn’t find any information regarding this on the internet. 

It would be great if you could give me this information. 

Thanks in advance. 
Best regards
HopeUserGermany
If you are worried about the radiation, you could only use 3G service, which outputs less wattage on the radio usually.

Feb 14, 2019 12:52:23 GMT capt jon said:
Feb 14, 2019 12:27:45 GMT HopeUserGermany said:





Hello support of Kospet, 

I recently bought myself a Kospet Hope and I was curious about the SAR value (specific apsorbtion rate) of this device. 

I couldn’t find any information regarding this on the internet. 

It would be great if you could give me this information. 

Thanks in advance. 
Best regards
HopeUserGermany
In researching this what I found was the laboratory methods used to measure SAR values of devices is somewhat inconclusive and not all that accurate.  But in answer to a question about the SAR value of a Samsung Gear 3 elicited the following response. 

SAR: Specific absorption rate (SAR) is a measure of the rate at which energy is absorbed by the human body when exposed to a radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic field. It can also refer to absorption of other forms of energy by tissue, including ultrasound.

Then: Relax, your smartphone and smartwatch won’t — and can’t — give you cancer (unless you are someone who walks around all day with it on and stuck in your ear)

Personally this is not something that even makes it onto my radar. 

Yeah, it’s far from your head (which means also from your brain), so you don’t have to be afraid of the radiation from your watch.

BTW, since the Hope has a tiny screen, you can use 3G instead of 4G: your battery will last a lot longer because of the even less radiation.


I have an RF meter at home (I’m @ work ATM), so I will test out the amount of radiation around the watch (Bluetooth, 3G, 4G, 2.4GHz and 5GHz wifi) and I’ll post my findings here (or at least on this forum).

On fccid.io you may find SAR values in measuring & test reports for smart watch devices. For GSM1900 the scaled SAR (W/kg) for smart watches is around 1. I am curious to see StormChild’s measurements.

Feb 14, 2019 12:52:23 GMT capt jon said:
Feb 14, 2019 12:27:45 GMT HopeUserGermany said:






Hello support of Kospet, 

I recently bought myself a Kospet Hope and I was curious about the SAR value (specific apsorbtion rate) of this device. 

I couldn’t find any information regarding this on the internet. 

It would be great if you could give me this information. 

Thanks in advance. 
Best regards
HopeUserGermany
In researching this what I found was the laboratory methods used to measure SAR values of devices is somewhat inconclusive and not all that accurate.  But in answer to a question about the SAR value of a Samsung Gear 3 elicited the following response. 

SAR: Specific absorption rate (SAR) is a measure of the rate at which energy is absorbed by the human body when exposed to a radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic field. It can also refer to absorption of other forms of energy by tissue, including ultrasound.

Then: Relax, your smartphone and smartwatch won’t — and can’t — give you cancer (unless you are someone who walks around all day with it on and stuck in your ear)

Personally this is not something that even makes it onto my radar. 
I don’t know the procedure to actually measure SAR but I forgot I have a SOEKS Dosimeter that is used to measure the radiation background and will add any increased radiation detected from objects, food, products etc. So when I turned on the device it measured the backgound at .09 uSv/h, which how radiation is measured.  I took my Lem 7 out of Airplane Mode and waited until I got several bars. I placed the meter next to my watch and it increased to .11 uSv/h. The manual shows 0 to .20 uSv/h is normal level and Safe. For what it is worth ?, it still is not something I put on my radar. I bought the meter several years ago in case of an EMP attack and check the fish I eat for radiation. 

Since SAR measures the absorption rate I don’t know how relative just measuring the amount of radiation the watch is giving off. But based on the reading I got, .02 uSv/h I would think you would have to spend a lot of time with it close to your head or body to do any serious harm. It was also mentioned in the article I read that BT is actually worse I would guess mostly where you wear a BT headset for long periods of time.

Feb 14, 2019 19:48:32 GMT capt jon said:
Feb 14, 2019 12:52:23 GMT capt jon said:
In researching this what I found was the laboratory methods used to measure SAR values of devices is somewhat inconclusive and not all that accurate.  But in answer to a question about the SAR value of a Samsung Gear 3 elicited the following response. 

SAR: Specific absorption rate (SAR) is a measure of the rate at which energy is absorbed by the human body when exposed to a radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic field. It can also refer to absorption of other forms of energy by tissue, including ultrasound.

Then: Relax, your smartphone and smartwatch won’t — and can’t — give you cancer (unless you are someone who walks around all day with it on and stuck in your ear)

Personally this is not something that even makes it onto my radar. 


I don’t know the procedure to actually measure SAR but I forgot I have a SOEKS Dosimeter that is used to measure the radiation background and will add any increased radiation detected from objects, food, products etc. So when I turned on the device it measured the backgound at .09 uSv/h, which how radiation is measured.  I took my Lem 7 out of Airplane Mode and waited until I got several bars. I placed the meter next to my watch and it increased to .11 uSv/h. The manual shows 0 to .20 uSv/h is normal level and Safe. For what it is worth ?, it still is not something I put on my radar. I bought the meter several years ago in case of an EMP attack and check the fish I eat for radiation. 

Yeah, a GMC (Geiger-Müller Counter) is good to measure alpha, beta and gamma particles, I have a GQ GMC-500+, but - although I have a few dozens of devices ordered from China - none of the devices I’ve checked emits any kind of radiation. If it shows a bit more radiation than the usual background radiation, it means some of the materials used has some contamination, but a few uSv/h doesn’t matter.


You need an RF meter like the ED88T ELF/RF Tri-mode EMF electrosmog meter - I can only share my experiences with you about this device, because this is what I own.

I’ll check my watch - first without a SIM card installed, because I don’t want to remove my only one from my phone, but I’ll test the 3G and 4G RF radiations too in a week or so.

Hi everyone,

thanks for the great replies. Sounds like a great community here.
@capt jon: Haha - ofcourse I am not afraid. Just curious, since I couldn’t find any offical values. And I just know that the maximum allowed value is 2 W/kg. So as jockyw2001 suggested this should be far off. However there also exist devices (e.g. from Samsung) wo are pretty close to 0.3.
So there is a huge variance in the values, and I just was curious about the Hope.
So therefore if StomrChild could really measure the device that would be awesome.

Also thank you for the tips regarding 3G and 4G - really helpfull regarding battery saving.